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Subject Catalog

Welcome!

Course and curriculum planning can be challenging. What do states require? What do colleges require? What do colleges “look for” in choosing an applicant?

We recommend you start with the Subject Planning tab and walk it through. This guide will walk you through basic steps for planning your school years.

If you already know what subjects you’re interested in, jump to whatever tab(s) you want.

When you’re ready to start searching our hundreds of courses, head to the Course Catalog where you can browse, filter, search, and then enroll.

If you have questions, please use the chat bubble on the bottom right of every page on our sites. If you don’t find what you want, then before you go please give us some quick feedback letting us know what you needed but could not find here.

Academic planning is unique for every student, and it has to be revisited every year. If you’re planning a lot of TPS courses for your students, you may request an appointment with our Academic Adviser once each year (students pursuing a TPS Diploma are required to meet with our Academic Adviser prior to enrolling each year).

We look forward to serving with your family in education and discipleship.

This Subject Planning guide will walk you through basic steps for establishing planning your school years and building a strong high school transcript.

Step 1 – Big Picture Planning

If you’re looking for an outline of a high school plan that meets state requirements, please look at the TPS Diploma (Standard and Honors) for a framework and reference.

If you’re planning a lot of TPS courses for your students, you may also request an appointment with our Academic Adviser (students pursuing a TPS Diploma are required to meet with our Academic Adviser prior to enrolling each year).

Step 2 – Start with English.

We recommend you start by planning your English courses and curricula.

  • Writing is required for success in all fields. Even Math and Science majors have to be able to write good essays and arguments to do well in their fields.
  • Besides English courses, Humanities and Social Science courses also require good writing skills, so writing and analytical reading will have the the biggest single impact on college success.
  • SAT and ACT and other standardized placement tests require writing.

Requirement: College readiness requires writing skills through Advanced Composition (TPS English 4/5).

Caution: Many high school English programs are light on writing instruction past the grade 9 level. Good writing is a skill that can be systematically taught and improved into college.

Go to the English tab to start planning your English courses, then return to this tab when you’re ready.

Step 3 – Build a strong conceptual Math foundation.

Learning Math is about more than the equations — it’s about developing the thinking skills that come from conceptual math problem-solving.

  • Analytical thinking skills are required for success in all fields.
  • Besides Math and Science courses, Humanities and Social Science courses also require analytical thinking skills. The “analytical essay” or “position paper” is the basic component of education and business communication.
  • SAT and ACT and other standardized placement tests require math through Algebra 2.

Requirement: College readiness requires Math through Algebra 2.

Recommendation: A strong transcript has a math course every year of high school, and includes at least one course beyond Algebra 2.

Caution: Homeschool math curricula tend to be light on conceptual problem-solving. It is worth the extra effort to build a strong foundation with a conceptual curriculum.

Go to the Math tab to start planning your Math courses, then return to this tab when you’re ready.

Step 4 – Two high school lab sciences is a minimum requirement, not a standard.

  • In the U.S., Biology and Chemistry are taught first in high school, so it is sometimes wrongly assumed that Biology and Chemistry are the only Science expectations. However, a strong transcript will have a solid science course every year, and reflect study in biological, chemical and physical sciences.
  • The “lab science” requirement assumes practical training in lab procedures and methods with formal lab reports, particularly in Chemistry. These can be harder to do well in homeschooling.
  • Chemistry requires Algebra. Students without a good Algebra foundation will not do well in a creditable Chemistry course.
  • Chemistry also assumes the student has had basic Physical Science first — often taken before high school. Students without basic Physical Science will have a harder time in Chemistry, but can generally overcome this with extra work.

Requirement: Two lab science courses taken in high school with rigorous research methods and laboratory skills, and formal lab reports.

Recommendation: A strong transcript includes a science course every year in high school.

Recommendation: Ideally the student be able to show high school level work in all three sciences: Biological, Chemical, Physical.

Caution: Chemistry requires Algebra. It also requires lab work. Homeschool Chemistry texts are sometimes lighter on the problem-solving, and particularly on the lab work and formal lab reports. Some also may omit some topics that are expected in a college-preparatory Chemistry course.

Go to the Science tab to start planning your Science courses, then return to this tab when you’re ready.

Step 5 – “World” History means the entire world.

For U.S. students, U.S. History and U.S. Government are required by most states as separate courses taken in high school. World History is expected for a strong transcript.

  • U.S. History taken at the elementary or middle school level does not count toward a high school U.S. History requirement.
  • U.S. History does not satisfy a U.S. Government requirement (even if you talk about Government in your History class).
  • Ancient History and Western History courses do not count as World History (though Ancient History may be required by some states).
  • It is ideal that a student take World History then U.S. History in high school (because U.S. History assumes a knowledge of world context), although this is not required. For instance, if a student is taking the AP U.S. History and the AP World History exams, he will find that World History helps with U.S. History.
  • History courses that are primarily discussion classes are hard to defend for credit. A strong transcript requires evaluated work (ample papers and tests).
  • Human history is a mix of faith-based and secular influences interwoven together. Both should be studied together to consider History as an academic subject.

Requirement: Requirements vary among states and colleges, but taking high school level World History and high school level U.S. History generally meets the varied requirements. Ancient History may be required by some states.

Caution: Homeschool History courses can sometimes be too light in evaluation (papers and tests) to be creditable. “Christian” History courses can sometimes fail to cover the whole picture of History expected for academic study. Where U.S. Government is listed as a separate requirement from U.S. History, it is required to be a separate course.

Go to the History/Gov’t tab to start planning your History and Government courses, then return to this tab when you’re ready.

Step 6 – Classical languages might not count as Foreign Language.

Most colleges require Foreign Language study in high school.

  • Colleges generally require two years of Foreign Language in high school. There are valid ways to credit Foreign Language study prior to high school or proficiency gained outside the classroom.
  • Colleges might not accept Classical languages (e.g., Latin) as meeting this requirement. You must check with each college.
  • Colleges generally do not accept tutoring, DVD learning or overseas experiences, unless there is also evaluation and examination (i.e., It is not enough to take a trip or listen to language lessons).

Recommendation: If you are not sure what colleges you are preparing for, the safe path is to take two years of a foreign language following a standard curriculum of spoken, written and cultural study. Other options may work, but will require more effort to explain on a transcript.

Recommendation: Consider taking Latin in middle school. It improves your English vocabulary and foreign language skills (especially for Latin-based languages like French and Spanish) prior to high school.

Caution: Failing to have two creditable years of a current foreign language may limit your college options.

Go to the Foreign Language tab to start planning your Foreign Language courses, then return to this tab when you’re ready.

Step 7 – Strong Academic Electives are not elective.

Since most college applicants meet minimum requirements, it is often the non-required courses that give the colleges the best picture of the applicant as a student.

  • The more challenging courses (e.g., honors courses, AP courses, dual college credit courses) a student takes and does well, the stronger his transcript.
  • Taking fewer challenging courses just to keep a high GPA still looks like a weak transcript.
  • Taking too many challenging courses and doing poorly in them looks like a student who can’t manage his work.

Recommendation: Take as many challenging courses as you can at as high a level as you can while maintaining a respectable GPA. Even if you don’t plan to major in some of the hard courses, they still help your college readiness and your transcript.

Caution: Listing group participation or life experiences as academic courses (e.g., co-op discussion group as a literature class or working on the car as an automotive repair course) does not present well on a transcript. Academic courses are expected to have significant formal evaluation. Similarly, listing courses as “honors” without sufficient comparative basis also does not present well. Colleges assume that an “honors” student will take AP exams and do well on them. Without that objective assessment, “honors” designations on courses do not carry much transcript weight.

Use the rest of the tabs on this page to research other courses to challenge and prepare your student with a good education and a strong transcript. When you’re ready to start searching our hundreds of courses, head to the Course Catalog where you can browse, filter, search, and enroll.

Step 8 – You’re off to a good start!

Academic planning is unique for every student and should be revisited every year. If you’re planning a lot of TPS courses for your students, you may request an appointment with an Academic Adviser once each year. For help building your best transcript, consider pursuing a TPS Diploma.

We look forward to serving with your family in education and discipleship.

TPS Summer Classes

TPS offers great summer courses for strengthening foundational skills to smooth out rough patches from the prior school year or give a head start for the next school year.

The TPS Summer term runs for six weeks, with a break week during the week of July 4 (total of seven weeks start to finish). Our Academic Calendar provides details.

Summer classes typically meet twice each week for two hours per meeting, usually on Monday+Wednesday or Tuesday+Thursday. Schedule details for each course are shown in the Course Catalog (select the “Summer” category). Because summer courses are fast-paced, students who plan to miss one or more sessions must request teacher approval for the missed sessions when they enroll in the course; summer enrollments with plans to miss multiple consecutive sessions may be disapproved.

We have general academic preparation courses like:

We have writing skill-building courses for elementary, middle school (junior high), early high school, upper high school, AP, and college:

We have math skill-building courses:

We have courses to prepare your student for our rigorous fall/spring courses:

English

Math

  • To prepare for Pre-Algebra, consider summer course: Pre-Algebra Prep Camp
  • To prepare for Algebra, consider summer course: Algebra Prep Camp
  • To prepare for Geometry, consider summer course: Algebra Review
  • To prepare for Algebra 2, consider summer courses: Algebra Review and Geometry Review (will be made available when there are sufficient requests)
  • To prepare for Precalculus, Statistics, or College Math (Quantitative Reasoning), consider summer course: Algebra 2 Review

Science

For the complete list of TPS Summer courses, please select the “Summer” category in the Course Catalog.

TPS Elementary School Classes

TPS Elementary courses are uniquely purposeful and enjoyable for our younger learners at home. Highlights include:

  • Build your complete curriculum or choose one or more individual courses for grades 5 and 6, extending to precocious grade 4 students.
  • Reading, Writing, Grammar, Literature and History (integrated), Math (standard and accelerated), Geography, Art, Music — even French and Spanish!
  • Live online interactive classes in secure classrooms with engaging audio-visual features, including safe purposeful use of cameras by teachers for demonstrations to engage younger students in their learning.
  • Instill a love of learning while also teaching foundational academic skills, including skills specific to each subject.
  • Build independent study skills so that by grade 7 most students can work on their own with limited supervision.
  • Get school done while freeing busy parents for other family priorities.

Build your own plan or give us your list of courses and we’ll build one for your approval. We can also help you choose the right academic (grade) level course in each subject to match the unique strengths of each of your individual students.

Study and Online Skills

Elementary Study and Online Skills

Grammar

Grades 5-6: Elementary Grammar
Grades 6-8 (Summer): Grammar Foundations for Elementary and Middle School Writing

Reading

Grade 5: Reading in Action 5
Grade 6: Reading in Action 6

Writing

Grade 5 (Summer): Writing for Elementary School (alternates content each year, may be taken twice)
Grade 5: Writing Fundamentals 5
Grade 6 (Summer): Writing for Elementary School (alternates content each year, may be taken twice)
Grade 6: Writing Fundamentals 6

Math

TPS offers Elementary Math (i.e, Math prior to Pre-Algebra) in two tracks: Accelerated and Fundamentals. Both tracks are thorough preparation for Pre-Algebra, the transitional course that bridges a student from concrete to abstract in preparation for Algebra and beyond.

Math Accelerated: More advanced topics in greater depth

Grade 4: Math Accelerated 4
Grade 5: Math Accelerated 5
Grade 6: Math Accelerated 6

Note: Strong Math Accelerated 6 students may skip Pre-Algebra and go straight to Algebra.

Math Fundamentals: Solid foundation for Pre-Algebra or Pre-Algebra (Honors)

Grade 5-6: Math Fundamentals 5
Grade 6-7: Math Fundamentals 6

Science

TPS offers a complete Elementary Science curriculum, covering life sciences and physical sciences.

Grade 4: Elementary Science – Discovering the Beauty of Science
Grades 5-6: Elementary Science – Discovering God’s Living World
Grades 5-6: Elementary Science – Discovering God’s Physical World
Grades 6-7: Introduction to General Science

These two courses are taught in alternating years.

Humanities: History and Literature

TPS offers an integrated Elementary History and Literature curriculum. Combine this with TPS Writing Fundamentals 5 and Writing Fundamentals 6 for a complete Elementary History, Literature, Reading, and Writing program.

Grades 4-6: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of the United States
Grades 4-6: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of the Ancient World
Grades 5-7: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of Asia and the Middle East
Grade 6-8: Christian World History – Heroes of the Faith

Social Studies

Grade 6-8: Globetrotters Geography

Spanish

Start Spanish in elementary school! Completion through Elementary Spanish 3 in elementary or middle school places the student out of high school Spanish 1, so he can go straight to high school Spanish 2.

Grades 4-6: Elementary Spanish 1
Grades 4-7: Elementary Spanish 2
Grades 5-7: Elementary Spanish 3

French

Start French in elementary school! Completion through Elementary French 2 in elementary or middle school allows the student to take HS French 1B or French 1 before high school.

Grades 4-6: Elementary French 1
Grades 4-7: Elementary French 2

Art and Art History

Grade 6-8: Art and Artists

Music

Grade 5-7: Foundations in Music 1

TPS Elementary courses are great preparation for TPS middle school courses, which are great preparation for TPS high school courses. TPS high school courses are unmatched for their effectiveness in preparing a student to do well in top colleges. If you are looking for a purposeful and enjoyable education for your young learner, please consider TPS Elementary.

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “Elementary” category in our Course Catalog.

TPS AP Courses – Top Scores for College Credit

Students who complete TPS AP® courses and follow our study guidance can expect to earn scores of 4 or 5 on those AP exams and get those credits from their college.

TPS is the top provider of online AP courses to independent students. We have the strongest record of test preparation success as measured by actual scores and percentiles each year. Our AP students score higher because we don’t just teach the AP topics and content — we also provide expert guidance and the latest resources for preparing to earn a high score on the AP exam. If you are planning to take an AP exam, then for best chance of earning a score that qualifies you for college credit you will want to take the certified AP course from TPS.

Why take certified AP courses from TPS?

  • TPS AP students are top scorers each year, with higher scores and percentiles than you will find elsewhere. Students who complete TPS AP courses and follow our study guidance can expect to earn scores of 4 or 5 on those AP exams and get those credits from their college.
  • Some TPS AP courses are eligible for direct college credit without taking the exam — a powerful option you will not find elsewhere. This allows the student to have two potential paths to college credit from one course, and to decide his best path based on his college choices and decisions. See the list below for details for each course.
  • TPS AP courses provide you the latest exam preparation guidance and resources provided by the College Board who writes and evaluates the exams. TPS AP courses are updated as often as needed (and more than you will find elsewhere) to stay up with the latest changes. (For example, during the 2020 AP exam changes necessitated by COVID-19 we updated our courses weekly and more to provide our students the latest and best guidance and resources.)
  • TPS AP teachers understand the grading process better than you will find elsewhere. We were the first (and maybe still the only) independent online provider with teachers selected as exam graders.

Which is better:  AP course or dual credit college course?

We get asked this often because we offer both with equal priority.

  • Advantages of AP Courses
    • AP exams are more universally recognized for credit by colleges than transfer credits from other individual colleges. This is especially useful if you are not sure where you want to go to college and you want maximum credit opportunity.
    • Colleges post their AP credit potential (i.e., what credits they provide or waive for scores of 5, 4 or maybe 3 on each exam) on their web site, so you don’t have to petition for credits to be accepted from another college.
    • AP exam scores are standardized (unlike transcript grades from high schools and colleges) and respected, so good AP scores generally carry more weight than good grades on a college application.
  • Advantages of Dual Credit College Courses
    • No AP exam preparation.
    • No single exam score to determine your credit potential.
    • If you know what college(s) you want to consider, you can check in advance to see if they will accept the credits from the dual credit college course(s) you might take.

If you know what college(s) you plan to consider and can be sure your colleges will grant or waive the specific credits you want for your dual credit courses, then the college course in high school is a great option. But if you want the strongest transcript and the widest acceptance of your credits — and if you’re ready to work for a 4 or 5 score on the AP exam — then the AP course that also prepares you for the exam is the better option.

Here is more discussion on considerations for choosing college dual credit courses.

Why take AP exams — why not just get credit for the AP course? 

  • Most colleges use good AP exam scores to allow you to gain specific credits and skip specific courses. No college gives credit for the AP course without the AP exam.
  • Competitive colleges use AP exam scores as part of academically ranking their stronger applicants. AP courses without the exam are considered like any other high school course on your transcript.
  • AP exam scores validate a transcript and make it stand out from a large pool of similar transcripts. AP courses without AP exam scores do not stand out in a positive way, and may even weaken a transcript in a competitive group.

How high do AP exam scores need to be? Competitive colleges require scores of 5 (highest) or 4 to receive college credit. Some schools give credit to scores of 3. Because higher scores matter, AP exams are usually taken in grades 11 and 12, sometimes in grade 10, and occasionally in grade 9.

What are good AP courses to take before grade 11?

A strong grade 9 and higher student should consider:

  • AP Human Geography – Standout HS social studies course. (Currently seeking a teacher.)

Strong grade 10 and higher students should consider:

  • AP U.S. History – Stronger alternative to a standard HS required course.
  • AP European History – Modern Western History course essential to a strong humanities curriculum.
  • AP World History – Modern – Stronger alternative to a standard HS World History course.
  • AP U.S. Government and Politics – Stronger alternative to a standard HS U.S. Government course.
  • AP Comparative Government and Politics – Excellent option for any student considering political or international affairs majors. (Currently seeking a teacher.)
  • AP Macroeconomics and Microeconomics– Stronger alternative to a standard HS requirement. Two HS credits in one year.

What are the primary considerations for choosing among the many AP courses?

Below is a list of AP courses offered by TPS. Where applicable, the corresponding dual credit college course is listed too. With each course, there are specific considerations for choosing that course. Some of this information is surprisingly hard to find elsewhere and provides answers to questions we are frequently asked about each course. TPS offers enough AP course options, preparation, guidance and support that every diligent high school student can boost his transcript with AP credit and exam scores.

  • AP Art History
    • Available from TPS as AP exam preparation or direct college credit (or both). Students choose in the beginning of the course whether to pursue just the direct college credit option (standard high school course workload) or do the additional work (approximately two additional hours per week) for the AP option.
    • Direct college credit option is one college semester of content that provides direct (no AP exam required) dual credit with a transcript from Belhaven University for ART 215 (3 credits).
    • Full AP option is more content and work to prepare for the full scope of the AP Art History exam. (The AP option also provides the direct college credit.)
  • AP Biology
    • No direct dual credit option so AP exam must be taken to seek credit through the college application process.
    • College Board requires both high school Biology and Chemistry as prerequisites, and so this course is usually taken in grade 11 or 12.
    • AP exam requires significant laboratory experience so the AP Biology course has extensive lab component.
  • AP Calculus AB
    • Available from TPS as AP exam preparation or direct college credit (or both).
    • Direct college credit option is one college semester of content that provides direct (no AP exam required) dual credit with a transcript from Belhaven University for MAT 207 (3 credits).
    • AP option is same content but student prepares for and takes the AP exam to seek credit through the college application process.
  • AP Calculus BC
    • Available from TPS as AP exam preparation or direct college credit (or both).
    • Direct college credit option is two college semesters of content that provides direct (no AP exam required) dual credit with a transcript from Belhaven University for MAT 207 (3 credits).
    • AP option is same content but student prepares for and takes the AP exam to seek credit through the college application process.
    • This course has the additional unique option that if a student takes the AP exam and scores a 5, he is eligible for direct dual credit with a transcript from Belhaven University for MAT 207 + MAT 208 (6 credits).
    • Student taking the exam must wait for exam results for any direct credit. Student may not apply for MAT 207 prior to exam results then MAT 208 after exam results.
  • AP Chemistry (currently not offered)
    • College Board requires high school Chemistry as a prerequisite, and so this course is usually taken in grade 11 or 12.
    • AP exam requires significant laboratory experience so the AP Chemistry course must have an extensive wet lab component.
    • TPS previously offered this course and even had amazingly high scores for a time. However, due to the extensive wet lab experience that is supposed to be part of this course, colleges asked us to reconsider the academic value of this course outside of the lab. Even with a high AP score, many colleges would prefer that this particular hands-on course be taken on campus in a full lab, and may be reluctant to give credit for it.
    • Students considering this course should check with their preferred colleges, and may find that they don’t stand to gain much from the significant time and money they will spend on trying to take it at home.
  • AP Comparative Government and Politics (currently seeking a teacher)
    • Strong analytical and essay skills required. Suitable for strong grade 10 and up.
    • Standout option for a student pursuing a degree or career in anything international.
  • AP Computer Science A (Java)
    • Though there is no formal prerequisite for this course recommended by the College Board, the content of the exam is advanced and students taking this course should already have a full-year Java Programming course or the equivalent experience prior to taking AP Computer Science A (Java) to prepare for the exam.
    • For a student who gained programming experience in high school, this AP exam is a great way to convert that experience into transcript recognition for college application.
  • AP English Language and Composition
    • This exam tests a specific set of writing skills. The TPS courses focuses on those skills, so our AP English Language students score considerably higher than others. If you don’t want to work for a high score on the AP English Language exam, take TPS English 5/6 College Composition for direct dual credit instead.
    • TPS offers a direct (no AP exam required) dual credit writing course, English 5/6 College Composition, with a transcript from Belhaven University for ENG 101 (3 credits).
    • A 4/5 score on the AP exam is generally worth more credit in more places, but the direct dual credit option is sufficient for many students to get college credit from their preferred college(s).
  • AP English Literature and Composition
    • This exam covers a broad set of literature analysis skills and objectives. The TPS courses focuses on those skills, so our AP English Literature students score considerably higher than others. If you don’t want to work for a high score on the AP English Literature exam, take one of the several TPS English 4/5/6 College Lit and Comp courses for direct dual credit instead.
    • TPS also offers direct (no AP exam required) dual credit Lit and Comp courses, including British Lit and American Lit, both of which earn a transcript for three college English credits from from Belhaven University.
    • A 4/5 score on the AP exam is generally worth more credit in more places, but the direct dual credit option is sufficient for many students to get college credit from their preferred college(s).
  • AP Environmental Science
    • Advanced science course that does not require a strong science background.
    • Standout transcript booster for a student needing a science course after Chemistry but who may not enjoy pure science or lab courses.
  • AP European History
    • Strong analytical and essay skills required. Suitable for strong grade 10 and up.
    • This exam applies a broad set of history analysis skills and objectives to European history. The TPS courses focuses on those skills, so our AP European History students score higher than others. If you don’t want to work for a high score on the AP European History exam, take TPS College Western Civilization – Ancient to 1780 for direct dual credit instead.
    • TPS also offers a direct (no AP exam required) dual credit world history course, College Western Civilization – Ancient to 1780, with a transcript from Belhaven University for HIS 107 (3 credits).
    • A 4/5 score on the AP exam is generally worth more credit in more places, but the direct dual credit option is sufficient for many students to get college credit from their preferred college(s).
  • AP French
    • TPS foreign language courses are well-known for being excellent preparation for their respective AP exams, and TPS AP French students score considerably higher than other students.
    • Ideally the AP language course is taken as the fifth year of the language study, but this requires the student to enter grade 9 at the second-year level, so it is also feasible to take the AP course as the fourth year of the language study.
  • AP German
    • TPS foreign language courses are well-known for being excellent preparation for their respective AP exams. The TPS AP German is new for 2020-21, but the program through level 4 is already highly-regarded an advanced German language program with no equal in the online community.
    • Ideally the AP language course is taken as the fifth year of the language study, but this requires the student to enter grade 9 at the second-year level, so it is also feasible to take the AP course as the fourth year of the language study.
  • AP Human Geography (currently seeking a teacher)
    • Ideal first AP course for strong grade 9 and up.
    • Some analytical and essay skills required.
  • AP Macroeconomics and Microeconomics
    • Strong analytical and essay skills required. Suitable for strong grade 10 and up.
    • Standout alternative to the standard Economics course required for high school graduation by many U.S. states.
    • Taking both macro- and microeconomics together enhances and reinforces knowledge of both subjects and helps students earn higher AP exam scores on both exams.
    • Transcripts and credits as two AP courses (students must complete the entire course to receive any credit and may not take either semester separately).
  • AP Physics 1
    • No direct dual credit option so AP exam must be taken to seek credit through the college application process.
    • AP Physics 1 replaces a high school physics course (high school Physics is not a prerequisite).
    • AP Physics 1 (algebra-based mechanical) can be followed by AP Physics 2 (algebra-based electricity and magnetism). (There is also the AP Physics “C” series, which are calculus-based. These are rarely offered in high school since calculus is a prerequisite.)
    • AP exam requires significant laboratory experience so the AP Physics 1 course has extensive lab component.
  • AP Psychology
    • A standout social science option with an exam that is generally considered among more attainable high scores on AP exams.
    • TPS AP Psychology course is particularly strong in incorporating a biblical worldview into an otherwise secularized topic.
  • AP Spanish
    • TPS foreign language courses are well-known for being excellent preparation for their respective AP exams, and TPS AP Spanish students score considerably higher than other students (some years they all get 5’s).
    • Ideally the AP language course is taken as the fifth year of the language study, but this requires the student to enter grade 9 at the second-year level, so it is also feasible to take the AP course as the fourth year of the language study.
  • AP Statistics
    • Statistics is a requirement for sciences, social sciences and any other data-driven fields of study. Many students in college wish they took statistics in a full-year high school course first because the semester college course moves too quickly for them.
    • Though Statistics is not really a math course, it replaces a math course as a standout transcript option for students who have completed Algebra 2 and do not need Calculus.
  • AP U.S. Government and Politics
    • Strong analytical and essay skills required. Suitable for strong grade 10 and up.
    • Standout alternative to the standard U.S. Government course required for high school graduation by nearly every state in the U.S.
  • AP U.S. History
    • Strong analytical and essay skills required. Suitable for strong grade 10 and up.
    • Standout alternative to the standard U.S. History course required for high school graduation by nearly every state in the U.S.
    • This exam applies a broad set of history analysis skills and objectives to U.S. history. The TPS courses focuses on those skills, so our AP U.S. History students score considerably higher than others. If you don’t want to work for a high score on the AP U.S. History exam, take TPS College U.S. History for direct dual credit instead.
    • TPS also offers a direct (no AP exam required) dual credit world history course, College U.S. World History, with a transcript from Belhaven University for HIS 105 (3 credits).
    • A 4/5 score on the AP exam is generally worth more credit in more places, but the direct dual credit option is sufficient for many students to get college credit from their preferred college(s).
  • AP World History – Modern
    • Strong analytical and essay skills required. Suitable for strong grade 10 and up.
    • This exam applies a broad set of history analysis skills and objectives to modern world history. The TPS courses focuses on those skills, so our AP World History – Modern students score considerably higher than others. If you don’t want to work for a high score on the AP World History – Modern exam, take TPS College Contemporary World History for direct dual credit instead.
    • TPS also offers a direct (no AP exam required) dual credit world history course, College Contemporary World History, with a transcript from Belhaven University for HIS 205 (3 credits).
    • A 4/5 score on the AP exam is generally worth more credit in more places, but the direct dual credit option is sufficient for many students to get college credit from their preferred college(s).

To find more details on these courses, please select the AP category in our Course Catalog.

*TPS has several sources for this data: Each year we survey our students after the exams to find out their scores and we query the College Board for their scores, and then we cross-check the data to compile a valid TPS data set of scores for each exam. We analyze the TPS data set against the national AP® scores and subscores (data is released by the College Board after each exam cycle) to statistically assess TPS scores and subscores for each exam each year. We also analyze our AP® course grades against the AP® test results, to ensure that our courses continue to support the level and content of each AP® test.

Courses indicated as AP® have received College Board review and approval. AP® is a trademark owned by the College Board, which is not affiliated with and does not endorse this site.

TPS College (Dual Credit) Courses – Cost-effective Credit Opportunities, Flexible Options

TPS offers college dual credit courses in a unique way that is advantageous for students. Our dual credit courses do not require college enrollment until later in the course, and then it is optional whether to enroll in the college course and pay for the college credits. A student may take the course as high school credit or dual credit, and may wait to decide until later in the course.

Taking some college courses in high school is becoming commonplace, particularly for independent (“home educated”) high school students. The touted benefits include saving on college tuition and finishing college sooner. However, while dual credit has proven to be beneficial in some cases, it has not in others. TPS has gathered feedback over the years from many former students who entered college with one or more dual credit courses (community college, online courses directly from colleges, and TPS College dual credit). Their “lessons learned” and advice for upcoming students are summarized in this article.

What you should consider in choosing dual credit courses

As you investigate your dual credit options and then plan your dual credit courses, here are the primary considerations most frequently offered or affirmed by our former students:

  • The college transcript is a more permanent record with more weight than a high school transcript. Don’t rush to take college credit courses without a good high school foundation in writing (for humanities and social studies college credit courses), math (for math and science college credit courses), and possibly statistics (for social studies college credit courses). Once you’re in the college course, no one will help you with the foundation you were supposed to have before you got there.
  • In high school, take dual credit courses that are outside your intended college major — save your in-major credit courses for the college where you plan to get your degree. Your high school dual credits are more likely to be accepted and count toward something outside your major. You will be better prepared for upper-level courses in your major if you took the 100 and 200 level courses from the same school, same department, and even same professors.
  • AP exam scores of 4 or 5 generally count for more credit and are more widely accepted than dual college credits in high school. AP exam scores are usually harder to earn than dual college credits in high school; colleges know this and so they respect the AP scores more and offer more credit for them. The most widely respected and accepted dual credit opportunity is the AP exam score of 4 or 5.

Questions to ask your college in choosing dual credit courses

Perhaps the most important dual credit feedback we hear from our alumni is that each student must map out his own best plan. Each college has its own policies and processes for how it accepts credits transferred in from outside the college. Therefore it is important that you research your specific potential colleges as far in advance as you can, including for choosing dual credit and AP courses. Here are key questions to ask:

  • Will the credits transfer to the colleges you are considering? Check first. It is easy enough to find out in advance, so don’t wait until after you take the course to learn that your intended colleges don’t accept credits from your community college or another college’s online program.
  • If the credits will transfer, what will they count toward? Again, check with your likely or potential college(s) first. You may find that your dual enrollment credits just expended your general (“Gen Ed”) and elective credits, still leaving all your required courses and leaving you less flexibility than if you had not taken the college credits in high school.
  • Would I get more credit if I took the similar AP course and exam? AP courses and exams are usually harder than the dual credit college courses, so there are pros and cons to consider for AP vs dual credit. But in many cases, the AP exam (with a good AP course) be your best dual credit option.

Many students report that despite having multiple dual credit courses in high school, their final college tuition bill and total courses required to graduate were not reduced much if at all, simply because some of the dual credit courses they chose didn’t “count” for anything that actually reduced their college load.

Unique advantages for you of TPS College (dual credit) courses

  • Pre-approved by Belhaven University for credit as Belhaven courses from the Belhaven course catalog. Students receive a standard Belhaven University transcript, not a hybrid or modified transcript.
  • University level (university is higher accreditation than college) credits are generally more transferable (always check with your other colleges about any transfer of credit).
  • Full-year live classes, not just semester courses, with all the academic content and value of both the high school and the college course.
  • Dual credit optional. You don’t enroll in the university course (or pay for the college credits) until early in the second semester (another advantage of the full-year format), and then only if you choose to get the college credit. You may opt to just finish the course as a high school course with just the high school tuition and credit. (Note the exception that Belhaven High Scholars program requires fall dual enrollment with Belhaven.)
  • Cost-effective. The college credit option adds a relatively small cost to the high school tuition, for a lower total cost than other dual credit or university courses.

TPS College (dual credit) courses and details

The links below take you to the course catalog details for each course, including the Belhaven University course number and name so you may cross-reference information as needed. The detailed steps and timelines for obtaining the college credit and transcript from Belhaven University for a TPS College (dual credit) course is found in the College Credit Transcripts process instructions.

Integrated Humanities
Belhaven High Scholars (24 English/History/Humanities credits)

Literature and Composition
College Composition (3 credits)
College British Literature and Composition (3 credits)
College American Literature and Composition (3 credits)
College World Literature and Composition (3 credits)

Mathematics
Precalculus/Trigonometry (3 credits)
Calculus AB (3 credits)
Calculus BC (6 credits – two semesters of college Calculus, each awarded 3 credits)

History
College U.S. History (3 credits)
College Western Civilization (3 credits)
College Contemporary World History (3 credits)

Social Science
College Psychology (3 credits)

Foreign Language
French 3 (3 credits – fourth semester college French)

Music
College Music Theory (3 credits)

Art
Art History and Appreciation (3 credits)

Classical Integrated Humanities Courses

Literature and History go together like bacon and eggs, right? TPS offers integrated humanities courses that combine literature and history in a “great books classical” approach. In addition to many integrated humanities courses from elementary to high school, we also offer a two-year high school curriculum that earns 24 college credits. All of these courses can be used in the TPS Diploma program. Here are details.

Two-Year Dual Credit Classical Integrated Humanities Program

Belhaven High Scholars is a Western Civilization humanities curriculum developed by Belhaven University and offered to high school students online through TPS. This classical program integrates western history, literature, composition (writing), and art appreciation into a two-year “Great Books”  curriculum which provides a total of 6 high school credits and 24 college credits. It emphasizes discussion and dialogue over memorization of information, and the efficient integration allows for a lower workload than if similar courses were taken individually. Each year is taught in four live classes per week. Belhaven High Scholars is available to upper high school students with good writing skills — no prior classical humanities background is necessary.

Grades 10-12: Belhaven High Scholars (Two Years)

Honors Level Classical Integrated Humanities Courses

Grades 4-6: Elementary Humanities: History and Literature of the United States
Grades 4-6: Elementary Humanities: History and Literature of the Ancient World
Grades 5-7: Elementary Humanities: History and Literature of Asia and the Middle East
Grade 9: American History, Literature and Composition (Honors)
Grades 10-12: Bible World History, Literature and Composition (Honors) (coming 2021-22)
Grades 10-12: Medieval, Renaissance, Reformation History, Literature and Composition (Honors)
Grades 10-12: Modern History, Literature and Composition (Honors)

Art and Digital Graphics Courses

Suggested Art and Art History Sequences

Our art courses not only teach skills and help students build their portfolios, but they help students worship and reflect their Creator through creative Art.

Grades 6-8
Art and Artists

Grades 9-12 Art 1
Art 1 – 2D Design (one semester)
Art 1 – Drawing 1 (one semester)

Grades 9-12 Art 2
Art 2 – Drawing 2 (one semester)
Art 2 – Painting 1 (one semester)

Advanced Placement (AP®)
AP Art History (College Art Appreciation)

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “Art” category in our Course Catalog.

Suggested Digital Graphics Art Sequence

TPS has a Digital Graphics Art program taught by a professional graphics artist for students who are enthusiastic and serious about graphic arts!

Grades 9-12
Adobe Photoshop
Adobe Illustrator

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “Digital Graphics” category in our Course Catalog.

The traditional Christian approach to Bible and worldview classes has generally been to join with other like-minded believers to “discuss” opposing views in a polemical approach, with little effort to genuinely understand and respectfully engage the other views. This approach is not serving a generation that has direct access (information and social networking) to other worldviews and to the people that hold them. Failing to engage other views accurately and respectfully leaves students ill-prepared for when they inevitably encounter the “real thing” outside the Christian classroom or discussion group. TPS offers many Bible, Apologetics and Worldviews courses, designed to compassionately and respectfully address real-life needs at every grade level.

Suggested Bible and Worldview courses

Grades 6-8

Grades 7-9

Grades 8-12

Grades 9-12

Grades 10-12

Grades 11-12

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “Bible and Worldview” category in our Course Catalog.

English As a Foreign Language (EFL)

What is TPS English As a Foreign Language (EFL)?

TPS English As a Foreign Language (EFL) trains students in academic English, so they can excel in other classes that use English in the classroom and in writing. TPS EFL can prepare you for Math courses, Science courses, Social Studies courses, and even English Literature and Writing courses.

How does TPS English As a Foreign Language (EFL) differ from other EFL programs?

Other EFL programs teach conversational spoken English and functional English reading and writing. Students learn to function as second-language English speakers, but they are not able to speak, read and write like strong English students.

TPS EFL teaches academic English speaking, reading, and writing. Our EFL students are placed into academic English courses (Literature, Writing, History, Social Sciences) sooner, and by the time they complete the TPS EFL program their academic English is on par with their native English-speaking peers.

No other EFL program offers this level of academic English.

What are prerequisites for TPS English as a Foreign Language (EFL)?

Prior to beginning the TPS EFL courses, the student must demonstrate sufficient conversational English skills. This is assessed through an interview with the teacher. TPS considers this prerequisite level to be EFL-Beginner (EFL-B). TPS has no EFL-B classes online, and recommends that beginner students take local live classes or tutoring.

What is TPS EFL-Intermediate instruction?

TPS teaches EFL-Intermediate (EFL-I) online. A student who passes prerequisite testing for TPS EFL-Intermediate (EFL-I) will take TPS EFL-I two years. A few students may finish in one year, if they were more advanced to start.

What classes (taught in English) may a student take after completing EFL-I?

After one or two years of EFL-I, the student should be ready to enroll in TPS Writing Fundamentals 5 (WF5) or Writing Fundamentals 6 (WF6), with the help of a tutor. The tutor program is called EFL-Advanced (EFL-A) tutoring.

What is TPS EFL-Advanced (EFL-A) tutoring?

After completing EFL-I the student may take English courses taught in English, starting with TPS Writing Fundamentals 5 (WF5) or Writing Fundamentals 6 (WF6). The student will be required to have an individual tutor for each English course until the student’s writing is fluent in academic English. TPS assigns this tutor as EFL-Advanced (EFL-A) Tutoring. The EFL-A tutor meets with each student one time per week for 30 minutes, to review English assignments and improve weaknesses in written English. There are additional fees for this required tutoring.

Then the student may progress each year from WF5 to WF6 to English 1 to English 2 to English 3, with an EFL-A tutor assigned each year until his writing is academically strong and the tutor is no longer required.

TPS EFL is good for all foreign students who want to learn English as a Foreign Language. It is ideal for Chinese students. If you prefer to communicate in Chinese, please contact TPS China for information and assistance. Here are instructions in Chinese explaining how to enroll in TPS classes.

Academic Electives

There are some Academic Electives which are so foundational that every student should consider taking them:

Also some foundational Bible courses:

TPS offers many other fantastic electives. You won’t be able to take them all, but you might want to try. To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “Academic Electives” category in our Course Catalog.

English Reading, Writing and Literature Courses

Why choose TPS English Reading, Writing and Literature classes?

  • Top English Writing and Literature classes grades 4 through 12.
    • TPS Literature courses all teach writing (compare with others that may grade essays but don’t teach writing).
    • TPS Literature courses all teach analysis of literature (compare with others that discuss books but don’t teach analysis).
    • TPS Writing courses (no literature) available for every grade level.
  • Top scores on AP English Language and AP English Literature exams.
  • Dual college credit in composition (writing) and literature.
  • Master analytical essay writing for English, History, SAT, and ACT.
  • Study of the Great Books (classics) of the western literary canon and world literature.
  • Thorough series of summer grammar and writing courses specifically designed to prepare students for TPS courses taught during the regular school year.

TPS English Reading, Writing and Literature Classes

Click the image below to open a view for easier reading.

Grammar Courses

Grades 5-6: Elementary Grammar
Grades 6-8 (Summer): Grammar Foundations for Elementary and Middle School Writing
Grade 7: English 1 Grammar Supplement (available only with English 1)

Reading Comprehension Courses

Build comprehension, understanding and thinking skills better in young readers.

Suggested English Writing and Literature Sequence

Other courses listed on this page should be added to this sequence where appropriate for academic level and need.

Grade 5 (Summer): Writing for Elementary School (alternates content each year, may be taken twice)
Grade 5: Writing Fundamentals 5
Grade 6 (Summer): Writing for Elementary School (alternates content each year, may be taken twice)
Grade 6: Writing Fundamentals 6
Grade 7 (Summer): Writing for Middle School (alternates content each year, may be taken twice)

Grade 7

Grade 8 (Summer): Writing for Middle School (alternates content each year, may be taken twice)

Grade 8

Grade 9 (Summer): Writing for Early High School

Grade 9

Grades 10-12 (Summer): Writing for Upper High School and College (summer before English 4/5/6)

Grades 10-12

Grades 11-12

TPS also offers other literature, poetry, and creative writing courses.

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “English” or “Literature and Media Analysis” or “Writing and Composition” category in our Course Catalog.

Classical Integrated Humanities Courses

Literature and History go together like bacon and eggs, right? TPS offers integrated humanities courses that combine literature and history in a “great books classical” approach. In addition to individual courses from elementary to high school, we also offer a two-year high school curriculum that earns 24 college credits.

Two-Year Dual Credit Classical Integrated Humanities Program

Belhaven High Scholars is a Western Civilization humanities curriculum developed by Belhaven University and offered to high school students online through TPS. This classical program integrates western history, literature, composition (writing), and art appreciation into a two-year “Great Books” curriculum which provides a total of 6 high school credits and 24 college credits. It emphasizes discussion and dialogue over memorization of information, and the efficient integration allows for a lower workload than if similar courses were taken individually. Each year is taught in four live classes per week. Belhaven High Scholars is available to upper high school students with good writing skills — no prior classical humanities background is necessary.

Grades 10-12: Belhaven High Scholars (Two Years)

Classical Integrated Humanities Courses

Grades 5-6: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of the United States
Grades 5-6: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of the Ancient World
Grades 6-7: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of Asia and the Middle East

Grade 9: American History, Lit and Comp (Honors)

Grades 10-12

Academic English as Foreign Language

Often students whose first language is not English desire to prepare for a national English exam, the TOEFL, or a high school or college program taught in English (e.g., a U.S. university, or an international university program, or even high school diploma from an English-speaking school). The Potter’s School offers an English as a Foreign Language series of courses, taught by culturally sensitive teachers experienced with both EFL and academic English instruction. These courses are designed to take a student from conversational English to whatever goal he sets: national English exam, TOEFL, or even academic English proficiency sufficient to participate in mainstream academic courses (math, science, social studies, etc.) taught in English. More information on TPS EFL…

Foreign Language Courses

Most college admission processes require two years of a foreign language in high school. Some colleges require that the language be a living spoken language, and others do not have that restriction. You should check with colleges you may be interested in, to understand their specific requirements.

TPS offers the most academically thorough online live interactive foreign language courses available anywhere, and we are continually adding to our offerings. We currently offer French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Russian, Arabic, Italian and Latin.

In several of our language courses (French, Spanish, Latin) we offer a Year 1A and Year 1B version, allowing the beginning student to take the first year of the language over two years, in a more relaxed pace to lay a more thorough foundation. Year 1A and Year 1B together fulfill the requirement for one year of a HS language, so students who take them can then go to Year 2 of that language. This is ideal for starting the language in grade 7, 8 or 9, because there is still plenty of time to complete Year 2 prior to college.

We also have Elementary Spanish and Elementary French.

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “Foreign Language” category in our Course Catalog.

History, Government and Social Studies Courses

“The earth is the Lord’s and the fullness thereof,
the world and those who dwell therein…” (Ps 24:1)

Social Studies may be seen as a set of interrelated academic disciplines (History, Government/Politics, Economics, Sociology, Psychology) that study human behaviors, events, cultures, and ideologies as part of God’s creation. History is then approached as study of God’s manifest plan as it has unfolded for individuals, peoples and nations.

Psalm 24 provides a foundation and framework for study of History and Social Studies within TPS, resulting in several academic commitments:

  • All things belong to God — not just “sacred” versus “secular” things.
  • All happenings are under God’s plan — not just happenings we like or with which we agree.
  • All people are created equally in God’s image — not just “western” people or “Christian” people.

Our academic and discipleship goal in TPS History, Government and Social Studies is to prepare students to understand, engage with and influence the real world. We emphasize study of original context so we can better understand things removed from our own time and situation, and more wisely consider lessons learned from them.

Our History, Government and Social Studies program is coherent and thorough, and a student who takes a well-planned set of TPS History, Government and Social Studies courses in high school will have unparalleled preparation for college and career with a global understanding and potential for world-wide impact.

Suggested History, Government and Social Studies Sequence

Click the image below to open a view for easier reading. Suggested grade levels and prior courses are not prerequisites.

History Courses

Grades 6-8: Christian World History – Heroes of the Faith

Grades 7-8

Grades 9-12

Grades 10-12

Government and Social Studies Courses

Grades 6-8: Globetrotters Geography for Middle School

Grades 9-12

Grades 10-12

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “History,” “Government,” or “Social Science” category in our Course Catalog.

Classical Integrated Humanities Courses

Literature and History go together like bacon and eggs, right? TPS offers integrated humanities courses that combine literature and history in a “great books classical” approach. In addition to individual courses from elementary to high school, we also offer a two-year high school curriculum that earns 24 college credits.

Two-Year Dual Credit Classical Integrated Humanities Program

Belhaven High Scholars is a Western Civilization humanities curriculum developed by Belhaven University and offered to high school students online through TPS. This classical program integrates western history, literature, composition (writing), and art appreciation into a two-year “Great Books” curriculum which provides a total of 6 high school credits and 24 college credits. It emphasizes discussion and dialogue over memorization of information, and the efficient integration allows for a lower workload than if similar courses were taken individually. Each year is taught in four live classes per week. Belhaven High Scholars is available to upper high school students with good writing skills — no prior classical humanities background is necessary.

Grades 10-12: Belhaven High Scholars (Two Years)

Classical Integrated Humanities Courses

Grades 5-6: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of the United States
Grades 5-6: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of the Ancient World
Grades 6-7: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of Asia and the Middle East

Grade 9: American History, Lit and Comp (Honors)

Grades 10-12

Math Courses

Why choose TPS Math classes?

  • Top online math classes grades 4 through 12
  • Top scores on AP Calculus BC, AP Calculus AB and AP Statistics exams
  • Dual college credit in College Math, Precalculus, and Calculus (AB and BC)
  • Solid foundation in Algebra, Geometry and Algebra 2 for SAT, ACT and higher math and science
  • Two levels of Math (Standard and Honors) in every grade

Are you familiar with the phrase “homeschool math”?

TPS began in 1997 by teaching math online to homeschoolers. We started with math because it was considered by most families to be the hardest to teach at home. Most at-home parents are not comfortable teaching math, particularly once you get to conceptual math (Algebra and up). The rapid early rise of homeschooling in the U.S. created a market for middle and high school math programs designed to be done by the average student at home. “Homeschool math” textbooks, workbooks and programs come in a lot of packages, but the basic approach is the same: remove the harder math concepts and reduce the rest to formulas. This is generally done by cutting out a lot of Geometry (sometimes so it is not even a separate course), which then allows some Algebra 2 to be cut as well, since a good Algebra 2 course requires Geometry and so should come after a full Geometry course.

Why does this matter to your student? TPS teaches one of the most effective Precalculus and Calculus programs available anywhere (check our AP scores). We get many applications for our Precalculus course from students who did not take our Algebra 2 or prior courses. We are forced to disapprove many of these (sending them to repeat Algebra 2 and/or Geometry) because there are too many holes in the prior math background.

But how does this matter if your student is going to be a non-math/science major and may never take Precalculus? You would be surprised where Algebra, Geometry and even much of Algebra 2 show up in other fields and careers, including design careers, social studies research, field work, and medical support and health careers — just to name a few. This is why most colleges require that the student have taken math through Algebra 2, and SAT/ACT tests include math through Algebra 2.

This is also where the expression “homeschool math” comes from: the student who later realizes that he hasn’t had some of the math he needs and has to say “I didn’t learn that in my homeschool math.”

Whether you have a strong enthusiastic math student or a reluctant one, do him or her a favor (even if it’s not fun) and make sure he gets a solid math education through Algebra 2 that doesn’t cut out important math concepts or reduce them to formulas. After that, he or she can decide where to go with (or without) math, but at least the options won’t have been limited back in early high school.

TPS offers a solid standard (non-honors) math track suitable for all students, including the student who may never take Precalculus. We also offer an honors math track for students who are “good at math” or who like math or who probably will take Precalculus. You can even start on one track and switch to the other, but either way you will learn the math you need for whatever comes after.

TPS Math Classes

Click the image below to open a view for easier reading.

Elementary Math (before Pre-Algebra)

TPS offers Elementary Math (i.e, Math prior to Pre-Algebra) in two tracks: Accelerated and Fundamentals. Both tracks are thorough preparation for Pre-Algebra, the transitional course that bridges a student from concrete to abstract in preparation for Algebra and beyond.

TPS Math Accelerated is based on the Singapore Math curriculum, which introduces more advanced topics a little sooner. Our testing has shown that students who do well in TPS Math Accelerated 6 are prepared to go straight to Algebra, effectively skipping a year of Math.

TPS Math Fundamentals is based on the Math Mammoth curriculum, highly regarded for its rigor and accessibility. It thoroughly prepares a student for the crucial transition of Pre-Algebra, which also uses the Math Mammoth curriculum.

Accelerated: More advanced topics in greater depth

Grade 4: Math Accelerated 4
Grade 5: Math Accelerated 5
Grade 6: Math Accelerated 6

Note: Strong Math Accelerated 6 students may skip Pre-Algebra and go straight to Algebra.

Fundamentals: Solid foundation for Pre-Algebra or Pre-Algebra (Honors)

Grade 5-6: Math Fundamentals 5
Grade 6-7: Math Fundamentals 6

Pre-Algebra through college-level Math

Pre-Algebra is the transitional course that bridges a student from concrete to abstract in preparation for Algebra and beyond. TPS offers math from Pre-Algebra through Algebra 2 in two tracks:  Honors and Standard.

TPS Honors and Standard tracks are both thorough preparation for college and career. Honors courses go deeper into some topics, assign some harder problems in homework and tests, and add a few more topics — all designed to better prepare a student for Calculus. Honors class lectures and discussions move a little faster and spend a little less time on review. Though Honors courses are ideal for preparing for Calculus, students who do well in the Standard courses will also be prepared to do well in Precalculus and Calculus. Students who start in one track can switch tracks later if needed, based on grades or changing academic goals.

TPS offers a wide range of options after Algebra 2, including Precalculus (Honors) followed by Calculus BC or Calculus AB; Statistics; or College Math (Quantitative Reasoning). TPS Precalculus and Calculus BC and AB are eligible for college dual credit.

Honors: Prospective Math/Science majors or other students preparing for Calculus

Grade 6-7 (Summer before Pre-Algebra): Pre-Algebra Prep Camp (Math 6 Review)
Grade 6-7: Pre-Algebra (Honors)
Grade 7-8 (Summer before Algebra): Algebra Prep Camp (Pre-Algebra Review)
Grade 7-8: Algebra (Honors)
Grade 8-9 (Summer before Geometry): Summer Algebra Review
Grade 8-9: Geometry (Honors)
Grade 9-10 (Summer before Algebra 2): Algebra Review, Geometry Review (will be made available if there are sufficient requests)
Grade 9-10: Algebra 2 (Honors)
Grade 10-11 (Summer before Precalculus): Algebra 2 Review
Grade 10-11: Precalculus (Honors)
Grade 11-12: AB Calculus, BC Calculus

Standard: Prospective Social Science or liberal Arts majors, or students preparing for AP Statistics or college-level Quantitative Reasoning or Trigonometry (Precalculus)

Grade 7-8 (Summer before Pre-Algebra): Pre-Algebra Prep Camp (Math 6 Review)
Grade 7-8: Pre-Algebra
Grade 8-9 (Summer before Algebra): Algebra Prep Camp (Pre-Algebra Review)
Grade 8-9: Algebra
Grade 9-10 (Summer before Geometry): Summer Algebra Review
Grade 9-10: Geometry
Grade 10-11 (Summer before Algebra 2): Algebra Review, Geometry Review (will be made available if there are sufficient requests)
Grade 10-11: Algebra 2
Grade 11-12 (Summer): Algebra 2 Review
Grade 11-12: Precalculus (Honors), College Math (Quantitative Reasoning), AP Statistics
Grade 12: AB Calculus

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “Math” category in our Course Catalog.

Music Courses

TPS offers some great Music theory and practice courses taught by talented experts. They may be taken in any sequence, with some targeted for younger students and others for older students.

Suggested Music Courses

Grades 5-7: Foundations in Music

Grades 9-12

Grades 11-12: College Music Theory (3 college credits)

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “Music” category in our Course Catalog.

Photography

Suggested Photography Sequence

Beginner
Beginner to Brilliant

Experienced
Going Pro! (one semester)

Photography students may also be interested in the Graphic Arts courses (e.g., Adobe Photoshop) for editing their photos and using them in media development.

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “Photography and Videography” category in our Course Catalog.

Science Courses

What do you need to consider when planning your science curriculum and choosing your science classes? What do colleges expect?

Most college admission processes require at least two years of a laboratory science in high school. Since Biology has no prerequisite, most students take Biology as one required science. Beyond that comes Chemistry (which requires a solid Algebra foundation), and then possibly Physics (which requires knowledge at least through basic Trig functions). Life Science and Physical Science are both great courses that help prepare junior high students for Biology, Chemistry, and Physics.

TPS Science Classes

TPS Science classes fully prepare you for college, including meeting the rigorous hands-on lab experience and formal lab reporting expectations often missed in homeschooling. TPS science classes combine thorough academic rigor and uncompromising biblical worldview.

  • Content. We bring you a more complete course, using other texts and materials to supplement the basic text. We stand firmly on a biblical worldview, but we include content to cover various perspectives thoroughly enough that students won’t be surprised when they encounter knowledgeable and persuasive adherents of other perspectives and worldviews.
  • Labs and Lab Reports. One of the areas of science where homeschoolers are least prepared for college is experience with labs and formal lab reports. We design our courses to prepare a student for formal lab reports in college, through a progression of teaching and examples, evaluated drafts, and final reports that systematically increases student proficiency throughout the course.

Suggested Science Classes Sequence

Click the image below to open a view for easier reading. The chart also includes a recommend standard plan and a recommended honors plan.

Grade 4: Discovering the Beauty of Science

Grades 5-6

Grades 6-7: Introduction to General Science

Grades 7-8

Grades 8-9: Earth Science

Grades 9-12: Health and Wellness (one semester)

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grades 10-12

Grade 11-12

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “Science” category in our Course Catalog.

History, Government and Social Studies Courses

“The earth is the Lord’s and the fullness thereof,
the world and those who dwell therein…” (Ps 24:1)

Social Studies may be seen as a set of interrelated academic disciplines (History, Government/Politics, Economics, Sociology, Psychology) that study human behaviors, events, cultures, and ideologies as part of God’s creation. History is then approached as study of God’s manifest plan as it has unfolded for individuals, peoples and nations.

Psalm 24 provides a foundation and framework for study of History and Social Studies within TPS, resulting in several academic commitments:

  • All things belong to God — not just “sacred” versus “secular” things.
  • All happenings are under God’s plan — not just happenings we like or with which we agree.
  • All people are created equally in God’s image — not just “western” people or “Christian” people.

Our academic and discipleship goal in TPS History, Government and Social Studies is to prepare students to understand, engage with and influence the real world. We emphasize study of original context so we can better understand things removed from our own time and situation, and more wisely consider lessons learned from them.

Our History, Government and Social Studies program is coherent and thorough, and a student who takes a well-planned set of TPS History, Government and Social Studies courses in high school will have unparalleled preparation for college and career with a global understanding and potential for world-wide impact.

Suggested History, Government and Social Studies Sequence

Click the image below to open a view for easier reading. Suggested grade levels and prior courses are not prerequisites.

History Courses

Grades 6-8: Christian World History – Heroes of the Faith

Grades 7-8

Grades 9-12

Grades 10-12

Government and Social Studies Courses

Grades 6-8: Globetrotters Geography for Middle School

Grades 9-12

Grades 10-12

To find more details on these and related courses, please select the “History,” “Government,” or “Social Science” category in our Course Catalog.

Classical Integrated Humanities Courses

Literature and History go together like bacon and eggs, right? TPS offers integrated humanities courses that combine literature and history in a “great books classical” approach. In addition to individual courses from elementary to high school, we also offer a two-year high school curriculum that earns 24 college credits.

Two-Year Dual Credit Classical Integrated Humanities Program

Belhaven High Scholars is a Western Civilization humanities curriculum developed by Belhaven University and offered to high school students online through TPS. This classical program integrates western history, literature, composition (writing), and art appreciation into a two-year “Great Books” curriculum which provides a total of 6 high school credits and 24 college credits. It emphasizes discussion and dialogue over memorization of information, and the efficient integration allows for a lower workload than if similar courses were taken individually. Each year is taught in four live classes per week. Belhaven High Scholars is available to upper high school students with good writing skills — no prior classical humanities background is necessary.

Grades 10-12: Belhaven High Scholars (Two Years)

Classical Integrated Humanities Courses

Grades 5-6: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of the United States
Grades 5-6: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of the Ancient World
Grades 6-7: Elementary Humanities – History and Literature of Asia and the Middle East

Grade 9: American History, Lit and Comp (Honors)

Grades 10-12

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